Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Oh Garden, My Garden & Links

Pictures of people's tasty multi-colored gardens are filling my feeds. Unfortunately, this happened earlier this summer:



These are photos of the hail an hour after it came down and had already begun shrinking as it evaporated (usually it doesn't last so long around here.) The tomatoes, the tall plants you see in the back, came through it fine, but the little plants in the front--green beans, carrots, and three kinds of lettuce--bit the big one. I re-planted some, so we'll see if I get anything from that. Other than that, it shredded my veggies! Boo!

We're already planning how to change things next year. Cheap, homemade greenhouse on the way!

Last week I posted about the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which, no doubt, everyone's tired of hearing of by this time. I do have a video of more than 20 folks doing the challenge with us for my dad, who was able to be there for it, but there's a cleaned up version coming, so I'm waiting to post it. Because of the IBC, our team has raised $1,260 for the ALS Association! With 18 days left to our walk, that is phenomenal! Even better are the tributes friends have done for my dad and posted, including Samantha Redstreake Geary. I've seen a bunch of you bloggie peeps doing it this week, and it's been fantastic! My and my family's thanks out to you.

Now for some links.

Accepting submissions:

The Lane of Unusual Traders is a world in creation. They are asking for people to bring this lane to life by writing short stories for the lots on this lane. A prologue has been written, and now they want stories based on the theme for an anthology. 1500-3000 words. Deadline August 31. Payment is $300 AUD.

SubTerrain is seeking submissions of fiction, poetry, memoir, and essay for their 69th issue with the theme of "meat." Deadline is September 1. Maximum 3000 words. Pays $50 per page or poem.

Grey Matter Press has put out a call for submissions for Savage Beasts: an Anthology of Primal Screams. Your story must be inspired by music. 3000-10,000 words. Deadline September 5. Pays $.02/word.

Christina Escamilla Publishing is open for submissions to the Welcome to the Future Anthology. Deadline September 15. Short stories (2000-8000 words) or flash fiction (250-500 words). Pays $100 for short stories or $25 for flash.

Mslexia accepts articles, prose, and poetry from women. Theme for Issue 64 is "ancestors." Deadline is September 16. Pay varies by type of submission. They are also holding a Women's Memoir Competition. Cash prize and possible publication.

Contests:

The Ordinary Guru Project is holding the Ordinary Guru Contest. They want to know about ordinary folks who have changed your perspective in short story, essay, memoir, photo essay, cartoon, graphic novel, or poem form. First prize is $5000. Deadline August 31.

Poets & Patrons is holding the Helen Schaible International Sonnet Contest. Shakespearean or Petrarchan sonnets only. No entry fee. Deadline September 1. First prize is $50.

Brilliant Flash Fiction is holding a Finish the Story Contest. They provide a story beginning and you provide the ending. Winner gets 20 euro. 300 word limit. Deadline September 15.

Real Simple is offering the Seventh Annual Life Lessons Essay Contest. First prize is $3000 and possible publishing in the magazine. 1500 word maximum. Deadline September 18.

Other:

Uncanny: A Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction is looking for a submissions editor/slush reader. Unpaid volunteer position. Apply by September 2.

Do you have a garden? Any successful veggies or fruits yet? Any of these links interest you? Anything to add? Publishing news to share?

May you find your Muse.

8 comments:

  1. Three years in a row, I tried to plant flowers in the flower beds. Rain was never predicted for that same week. Every single time, we got a massive storm. The one year I didn't try, little green stems started poking up out of the ground and grew to be half my height. I do not have a green thumb.

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  2. That's awesome you raised so much!
    Sorry about your garden. We get hail like that here. Last time it took out my neighbor's window screens.

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  3. I'm sorry the hail ruined your veggies. I'd be upset about that, too. I'm a vegetarian. I love veggies! lol

    What you and your team raised for ALS is amazing! Way to go!!!

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  4. How amazing that you found a way to raise so much $ for the ALS cause. Kudos to you and your gang. Sorry about your garden. I've gone through that with our Catskill garden. There are years we lose entire apple crops up there. Nature, meh!

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  5. We don't get much hail here, but I've been in some big hail storms when I lived in Shreveport.

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  6. I have a small container garden this year. Six pots. Four have tomato plants and two have pepper plants. We've been having some heavy rains and winds that have knocked the pots over. My husband and I have both had to rescue the overturned pots a couple of times each.

    That is AWESOME the amount of money your team has raised for the walk!

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  7. There's a lot of love for the ice bucket challenge. I grew grapes in New York and the things took over the backyard.

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  8. Rachel, doesn't it always work that way? It's a good thing we have grocery stores these days or many of us would starve.

    Alex, a bunch of people had home damage (and roof damage), but not in my direct area. Thank goodness! We've been through the ones that destroy the roof and our cars.

    Chrys, I love fresh veggies. I always look forward to summer for our garden spoils.

    Catherine, oh man, I would be so sad to lose apple crops. I could live off apples (probably not literally, but I'd try.)

    Andrew, interesting that you don't get hail there, but you did in Shreveport. Why is that?

    Susanne, I hope you get a good crop! Maybe we need to split ours in half, have half in the garden and half in containers we can pull inside.

    Maurice, there's a lot of hate for it, too. Makes me feel defensive, I admit. Now that's a successful crop! How did you manage that?

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