Wednesday, April 27, 2016

[Mostly] Wordless Wednesday - Rock Piles & Links

Someone left behind some rocks on the rocks in front of the rocks. At Garden of the Gods. (From a hike a few weeks ago.)



I don't remember what these piles are called, but I know there's a name...

Jumping straight into links. Bear in mind, I'm not endorsing these, merely passing them along. Always do your own due diligence before submitting.

Accepting Submissions:

FTB Press is seeking stories about renegades. 2400-4200 words. Pays in royalties. Deadline May 28.

Book Smugglers Publishing is now looking for novellas to put out quarterly. Speculative fiction. 17,500 to 40,000 words. Will pay a signing bonus, plus royalties. Deadline May 30.

One Story is seeking literary fiction. 3000-8000 words. Pays $500 and 25 contributor copies. Deadline May 31.

Caffeinated Press is seeking stories of all lengths (except for novels), plus poetry. Pay is between $10 and $150, depending upon length and type, plus contributor copies. Deadline May 31.

Nashville Review is seeking all kinds of fiction and poetry. Up to 8000 words. Pays $25 or $100, depending upon type of submission. Deadline May 31.

SpeckLit is seeking 100 word speculative fiction. Pays $.05/word. Deadline May 31.

Otter Libris is seeking stories about the circus for Now in the Main Ring: Amazing Tales From the Circus. 3000-10,000 words. Pays $25, plus a contributor copy. Deadline May 31.

Vestal Review is seeking flash fiction. Up to 500 words. Most genres. Up to $25 payment. Deadline May 31.

Lit Select is seeking stories for Love Slave: Score. Erotic fiction. 2000-8000 words. Pays $30. Deadline May 31.

AGNI is seeking poetry, short fiction, and essays. Pays up to $150. No word limits. Deadline May 31.

Any of these of interest? Anything to share? Do you remember what the piles of rocks are called? Publishing news?

May you find your Muse.

19 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. It was a good addition, for sure. And a sight of interest.

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  2. I see these creative piles at the beach a lot, too. Maybe there's a mad sculpture loose in the world. :-)

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    1. I've never seen one at the beach! I wonder if it would be harder or easier to get them to balance on sand vs. sandstone.

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  3. People make cairns here, too (I think AJ got it right), especially along the shore. I've made them for my pets who have died as well.

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  4. I love the red rocks you have in your part of the country. Didn't see any of those piles when I visited The Garden of the Gods.

    Susan Says

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    1. I love the sandstone. It's similar in the Australian outback. Not sure about other areas. I've been to GoG a lot, but this is the first time I've seen cairns there, I think.

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  5. Hi Shannon - yes Cairns ... they marked the way and in ancient times helped travellers perhaps find their way, or marked out where someone died - as on the Skeleton Coast in Namibia.

    Providing us with our imaginative brains ... to create something new - cheers Hilary

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    1. Thank you for sharing that history of cairns, Hilary!

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  6. Thanks for your comment on my blog. And I did have a fabulous time with my daughter and grandson. He is eleven and brought his boots with him because he wanted to go exploring in my jungle. I gave him a small machete and we went into my jungle and he was in heaven chopping down some vines and looking for snakes. Also, here where I live, the local Mayans stack rocks. I always wondered why. If you know of a spiritual reason, or the name, I would love it if you could let me know.

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    1. Hilary posted above that they helped travelers find their way or marked where someone had died. It adds to them for me, knowing that. I'm glad you had fun with your grandson and daughter!

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  7. Appreciate the links!! Thanks, Shannon!!

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  8. Hey Shannon,

    I know one thing, for sure, you Rock!

    Thanks for the links, Shannon.

    Gary :)

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    1. Nothing like a human-made pile of rocks. "A cairn is a human-made pile (or stack) of stones. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn (plural càirn). Inuksuit in northern Canada were markers used for wayfinding and to locate caches of food or other stores."

      Thanks for um, cairn.....

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